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What is the Lincoln County Coalition Against Child Abuse?

  Child abuse and neglect has a devastating impact on the life of a child that goes beyond the incredible physical and emotional pain that is inflicted upon them.

  Most often, these children suffer from developmental delays and behavioral problems that last a life time.  Ultimately, due to related costs to public entities such as the health care, human services, and educational, juvenile justice systems, abuse and neglect impact not just the child and family, but society as a whole. 

  2008 statistics show that in America every 33 seconds a child becomes a victim of neglect or abuse in some form.  The estimated cost on society for this abuse is $104 billion dollars annually.  The case for prevention is persuasive.  Not only is it the humane approach, it is the financially responsible approach.

  Programs designed to prevent child maltreatment and care for its victims serve society in several ways: they build stronger, healthier children; they reduce the burdens on state services such as education, law enforcement, corrections, and mental health; and they free money to be spent on more life-enhancing projects. 

  An ounce of prevention truly is worth a pound of cure.

History: In 1991 a group of concerned members of our Community became aware that instances of child abuse were rising significantly each year in Lincoln County. Melinda Houser of the Cooperative Extension, and Ola Mae Foster a school social worker, began to organize efforts to create an organization that would provide awareness, prevention and education about child abuse to the citizens of Lincoln County, particularly the children.

  In 1994 the LCCACA received its letter of determination from the IRS.  In July of 2007 they opened the Child Advocacy Center (CAC) which coordinates investigative and treatment efforts for children who are victims of child abuse here in Lincoln County.  Since that date more than 600 children and their non-offending family members have received assistance from the CAC.

Purpose: The Lincoln County Coalition Against Child Abuse, Inc. is a citizen-based organization dedicated to preventing child abuse and neglect in all forms and providing intervention and treatment when our children have become victims. The Lincoln County Coalition Against Child Abuse’s Child Advocacy Center is dedicated to being the primary source of relief through a coordination of efforts when a child is victimized.

 

What is the Lincoln County Child Advocacy Center?

  The Lincoln County Child Advocacy Center (CAC) is a non-profit program under the Lincoln County Coalition Against Child Abuse organization. It was created by professionals from the child protection division, law enforcement departments, prosecutor’s office, school personnel, medical and mental health community, and by local individuals that recognized a need for a better way to serve young victims of child abuse.

  From dialogue generated by these concerned citizens, the CAC evolved and now works together with agencies and professionals to reduce the trauma of severe physical and sexual abuse experienced by children.

    Children referred to the CAC are greeted by sensitively trained staff and child abuse professionals. The professionals work together within a coordinated multidisciplinary team to lead the investigation. Specially trained and certified staff works with the child and the non-offending parents or caretakers and other family members for successful prosecution of the offender.

  The Lincoln County Child Advocacy Center is a place that gives each child that visits a donated and huggable new teddy bear provided by individuals and various groups. It is a place where young victims of child abuse begin their healing process.

This project was supported by Grant No. 2012-VA-GX-0060 awarded by the Office for Victims of Crime, U.S. Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, conclusions, and recommendations expressed in this publication, program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice, Office for Victims of Crime.